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, telecommunications, health care, research and development, transportation, and civil rights. he was later appointed special counsel by janet reno. he later represented the united states as u.s. ambassador to the united nations and served as a special envoy to sudan. he has been a great friend to missouri, st. louis, and washington university. please join me in welcoming him now. [applause] >> thank you. thank you very much. i owe our speaker an apology. when you hear the apology, you are going to conclude that i am a really terrible human being. i am the kind of person who takes advantage of a friend, especially a friend who is vulnerable. when he is vulnerable, i pounce. tonight's origin was a rehearsal dinner the night before the wedding of victoria will, george's only daughter. george was standing on the edge of the hotel ballroom taking and one of life's great moments. the marriage of the daughter is so deeply emotional. george the loving father was clearly caught up in a moment. that was the moment i seized the opportunity to strike. i sidled up to him and whispered ever so softly in his ear,
of the most dramatic events that occurred in the civil rights movement. and one of those occurred in my hometown of marion, alabama. pretty dramatic. >> host: now, where do you live now, first of all? >> guest: i live in tuscaloosa, alabama, which is 60 miles up the road but almost in another, more recent century than my small hometown. >> host: and darkroom is a lot about the civil rights movement and some of the experiences that you had. >> guest: yes. >> host: want to start with your father. what did he do for a living, and what was his experience like? >> guest: my father was a teacher. he had a background also in the ministry, but he was an amateur photographer. he did some freelance work, and that figures centrally in my book, "darkroom." >> host: and i wanted to ask about his ministering, because he'd been assigned to some churches, and you write about that in here. what was his experience? >> guest: well, this wasn't, actually, my family ice first immigration period before i was born. so in 1948 my father came to the u.s., and he studied at a seminary in new orleans, and he went
and development, transportation, and civil rights. he was later appointed special counsel by janet reno. he later represented the united states as u.s. ambassador to the united nations and served as a special envoy to sudan. he has been a great friend to missouri, st. louis, and washington university. please join me in welcoming him now. [applause] >> thank you. thank you very much. i owe our speaker an apology. when you hear the apology, you are going to conclude that i am a really terrible human being. i am the kind of person who takes advantage of a friend, especially a friend who is vulnerable. when he is vulnerable, i pounce. tonight's origin was a rehearsal dinner the night before the wedding of victoria will, george's only daughter. george was standing on the edge of the hotel ballroom taking and one of life's great moments. the marriage of the daughter is so deeply emotional. george the loving father was clearly caught up in a moment. that was the moment i seized the opportunity to strike. i sidled up to him and whispered ever so softly in his ear, would you mind giving a lecture at washi
states, war has been an engine of civil right. because you might be able to afford the waste of human resources involved in discrimination against a race or class or gender in peace time. when you have to rally resources of the nation to take on a crisis like the civil war, like world war ii, you need everybody. pretty quickly by the end of 1862, you have women running the entire public health system, towards the and clara barton were important figures in washington and airways -- there was when the soldiers needing treatment and there was no preparation for them. and these partially women volunteers created the response. i wasn't the war department. linking you see and has laconic patience and very pragmatic way adjusting to these new realities every day. these dichotomies and lichen, a very important one was this huge fish and over three generations from now will be richer from europe and the lazio at the same time would say, look, i don't know from day to day what i am going to be dealing with. my goal is to get from morning to night each day and do what thomas problems i say. one
the tense confrontations of the civil rights movement and the life and death decisions been made during the cuban missile crisis. >> caroline kennedy and a discussion on the 1962 recordings of the late president in the oval office. as we continue to the holiday on c-span2. >> as president obama begins his second term in office, what are the most important issues to consider for 2013? >> make a short message for the president. >> joined the student can competition -- student cam competition. for more information go to studentcam.org. >> supreme court justice stephen breyer was recently at the brookings institution to talk about his new book. he also discussed china and the history of the u.s. constitution. this is just over an hour. >> ok. concepts. for 20 years i have been advising -- roughly half of that on financial economic matters. the other half a variety of topics. about 10 years ago, um we started -- about 10 years ago, we started talking about role of law. i said to him at the time, what strikes me about this topic was that other than the occasion i can think of, other than when
which has put the economic question front and center. unlike the civil-rights and feminists and many other important movements of our time where there was fear of going in that direction, they were not ready for it, the police would be angry and arrest of a. this is a movement that's that we are putting the question of the 1% and 99% front and center. that opens a space that this book is not doable without the space opened by occupy wall street or the interests. if i am correct in understanding this, its third printing and it only appeared in may of this year, the thanks go to the people like the occupy wall street people who are willing to break from the tradition not to be limited by the end dumb ~ either/or republican and democrat and are willing to push in another direction. >> another question on the occupy movement, what has happened to it? it seems to have gone into some sort recess for stasis. >> a great political leader of the left whose name i won't mention because it frightens people is well known for having said political movements do not develop in a straight line. it do
] there was no title vii. i graduated in 1959. title vii under the civil rights act was in 1964, all on discrimination on the basis -- outlawed discrimination on the basis of discrimination -- religion, and sex. and 1950s, law firms, and some of the finest graduates were saying they wanted no women. they would feel uncomfortable dealing with a woman, or as often her, we hired a woman at this from once, and she was dreadful. how many men did they hire that didn't work out? so it wasn't easy to get that first job. first job was all important because if you got it and performed well, then the next job was secure. well, i had a great professor, someone may know you -- some of you may know his name, he was the first constitutional law scholar, and he was in charge of getting judicial clerkship for columbia law school students. and i was special. he was determined to give me a federal clerkship. so he recommended me to a judge who always hired his law clerks from columbia. and then -- [inaudible] is ruth bader ginsburg. she has a four year old daughter. how can i rely on her? and the professor said, give he
the rebel yell right out of the civil war. one of the rangers said it was one of the most glorious moments to be a ranger. as they charged across the field was the perfect time. the artillery was now falling on the germans rather than a sunken road. was the perfect window of opportunity and they seized the pillboxes and went up the hill. what happens next is unbelievable. with hardly any men they started out with roughly 120 men, they lost many men in the charge, lost men, ran up the hill, i have been to this place and toward it with a german veterans, ran up the hill and took the pillbox that was on top of the hill which was the main center of gravity because it offered protection and the protection it offered was from the artillery. picture a rainstorm but instead of raindrops it with shrapnel and tree splitters. 18 battalions of german artillery rained down on that hill, killing germans and americans alike. it became unbearable. on top of that, within half an hour, 45 minutes, the germans according to their doctor and began to power back. they hit it with company strength or more. somet
reasons for not freeing his slaves. you're quite right. he never intended to faith and even if he hadn't been in debt. but he did argue that to do so would be civil war and that the only solution would be a scheme in which all slaves moved to the caribbean or back to africa. and, of course, you could argue that it's not justification but it's also a reason worth considering. i came at this very differently. i was a caribbean scholar working on -- these are some of the most your awful regimes anywhere. and i was very aware -- [inaudible] the moral issue of slavery. they never discussed it before or during the american revolution. in fact the first place is what discusses here in america, even -- being opposed to slavery itself was remarkable. it's only in the western only in the 18th century that you have an abolition movement. people actually questioning the morality of slavery. so to me, jefferson was remarkable in that he actually questioned the system and had enough empathy to realize that slaves freed would be so angry at the way they were treated that it might actually rebel. i do
simple geographic place with all of these natural harbors and rivers that run the right way but that was true for thousands of years and didn't leave to the development to rate civilization and european civilization and began to make powerful use of those the geographical advantages are obvious, so help us think about why it's geography that we should focus on as opposed to the cultural or civilization will aspect. >> that was due to the development of the failing chips which enable the croswell landed voyages, so that development of technology while it is short in distance it did not negate, it made it more important because it opened up a whole new geography and the world trade system cultural and economics flow from the geography because what is culture? it is the accumulated experience of a specific people on may specifically and skate over hundreds of thousands of years that leads to tradition and habits that can be identifiable. one of the places i've always considered to have the most deeply denzel identifiable culture shock is remaining. you know, nobody can admit th
the truck was actually carrying. there is no word yetcaused this. jamie: well, right now there is word of a high level defection in syria's civil war as the general of the country's military police reportedly switches sides and joins the opposition. ambassador john bolton joining us now, former u.n. ambassador to the united nations fox news contributor. am bass do, great to see you. thanks for joining us. >> good morning. merry christmas belatedly. jamie: merry christmas to you. how significant is this defection away from assad. >> i think it has couple important aspects. this is another high level general. there is political implication there. we'll have to wait and see whether it induces other regime military authorities to defect as well. second, for the opposition undoubtedly this will give them important information about what's going on inside assad's military, perhaps inside the regime itself. what's the disposition of forces? are they well-armed? what is their morale? where might they be vulnerable? whether this general is welcomed by the opposition and contributes to them mili
. and mostly after you passed your exams you would progress through the civil service. a very few got through the exams and said "i'm gonna drop out. "i don't want to be an administrator. "i want to go out into the landscape and right poetry. i want to paint paintings." and these were the literati, and this is the sort of thing that they did. and what's fascinating about this is we've got here, effectively, the table on which you did your scrolls. i've never noticed that. now, here we have a painting of-- i don't know whether he's-- he may be a grandfather, he may be a particular member of the literati. one can't be sure. the boys are bringing him refreshments. have you seen this? i've noticed that, yes. do you know what it is? it could be a bird or a bat or something. it's a bat! it is a bat? yeah. this boy's pointing at it because a bat in chinese is fu and fu is a homophone for "happiness." oh, right. and a red bat... ...is double happiness. oh, okay, yeah. isn't that wonderful? i mean, just a tiny little thing, and it just works. and it just gives the pi
, this crisis is long term. maybe we do need to get a little more aggressive especially when civil liberties have apparently been infringed upon. i also have the observation that government lawyers, i would say this. when you are the government you have an obligation to make things right. if you have done some the wrong he should make it right. it is not a good comparison but i remember when i was in the military, medical malpractice cases, if we were wrong we figure out how big the check was going to be, that is the right thing to do when you are the government. this is an important question and i urge you to take a look. >> judge brown elevated, make a difference? >> i think there would be a difference of opinion, correctly decided in the first interest and whether subsequent practical experience had led one to the conclusion, i fundamentally agree with what charlie was saying about i started at the justice department office of legal counsel after september 11th. i thought our was going to do establishment cause but national security, counterterrorism, international law, we sat down and lo
, for documents and testimony in a civil case to which i am not a party. after consultation with the office of general counsel, i will determine whether compliance with the subpoena is consistent with the privileges and rights of the house. signed, sincerely, david russell, district liaison, u.s. representative david price. the speaker pro tempore: without objection, the house stands adjourned until 2:00 >> we are going back to the conference on women in leadership with andrea mitchell and nancy-ann deparle. >> she gave me the notion i could do anything i wanted to do. >> how did she do that? >> she had very high expectations and let me know she expected me to do well in school. when i would talk to her about wanting to work in the white house for being interested in politics or being a lawyer, she said you have to study hard and make good grades. you need to get a scholarship because i will not be able to afford it. she never said -- the sky was the limit. that really was her view. it made me think i could do anything. i did go to law school. in the early 1980's when i got out of law schoo
Search Results 0 to 15 of about 16 (some duplicates have been removed)

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